BIOGRAPHY

Philip Womack: credit Tatiana von Preussen
Philip Womack was born in Chichester in the middle of a thunderstorm in 1981. He is the author of six critically acclaimed novels for children:

Two stand-alones: The Other Book (2008)

The Liberators (2010) 

The Darkening Path trilogy:  

The Broken King (2014)
The King's Shadow (2015)
The King's Revenge (2016)

The Double Axe, a re-imagining of the minotaur myth, was published in early 2016.

Philip was educated at Lancing, and Oriel College, Oxford, where he read Classics and English. He lives in London with his wife, the architect Tatiana von Preussen, his son, and his lurcher.

He is currently a Contributing Editor at Literary Review and writes for The Daily TelegraphThe Guardian, The Spectator, and The Times Literary Supplement, among other papers. This year he is teaching Children's and Young Adult Fiction at Royal Holloway University, and is Patron of Reading at the John Roane School in South London.

He leads workshops on Greek Myth, Greek Tragedy and How to Write Children's Fiction for the How To: Academy and was a Fellow of First Story.

In 2014, with Clementine Macmillan-Scott and Anna Baddeley, Philip co-founded the magazine SCOOP, now published with Sarah Odedina as its editor-in-chief.

Womack Staithe, Ludham, Norfolk
A NOTE ON THE SURNAME WOMACK

A lot of people are interested in the surname Womack. It is an ancient English surname, derived from the same word as "womb". Womack essentially means "stomach", and possibly derives from a diminutive (See the Oxford Dictionary of Surnames). Womack families have always been strongly linked to Yorkshire and Norfolk. Early Womacks are recorded in the 14th century in Yorkshire; the ecclesiastical family of Laurence Womack, Bishop of St Davids, was a prominent Royalist family in Norfolk in the 17th century. There is a memorial to the Bishop in St Margaret's Church, Westminster, and his pedigree can be viewed here. You can visit Womack Staithe, Womack Water in Norfolk. The surname has also been connected to an 11th century knight named Robertus Wiuhomarch.



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